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Carl Reiner on life at 95, best career moments, and Trump

Larry King NowApr 05 '17

Larry visits entertainment icon Carl Reiner at his Beverly Hills home for a special conversation about Reiner's illustrious career, life at 95 years old, and, of course, the funnyman's well-known disdain for Donald Trump.

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Larry chats with Carl Reiner, who created, directed, and starred in ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show.’ Reiner also worked with Mel Brooks in the comedy skit ‘The 2000 Year Old Man,’ directed films like ‘Where’s Poppa’ and ‘The Jerk,’ acted in ‘Ocean’s Eleven,’ ‘Ocean’s Twelve,’ and ‘Ocean’s Thirteen,’ and has a role in the upcoming spin-off ‘Ocean’s Eight.’ He is also promoting his newest book, the graphic diary ‘Carl Reiner, Now You’re Ninety-Four.’ Reiner is now 95, and King asks what keeps him going. Reiner responds that it’s having something to do, usually writing, and that his next book is ‘Too Busy to Die.’ King questions what it’s like to have this longevity, and Reiner acknowledges difficulties, such as his head leaning forward and falling down a flight of stairs. He shows King some helpful exercise pictures from his book, which chronicles his everyday life. It can be ordered on randomcontent.com, with an option for a personalized copy.

Delving into Reiner’s personal relationships, King asks about his work with the late Mary Tyler Moore. Reiner recounts her difficult childhood, with a mother who died of alcoholism and a father who barely talked to her. The last time Reiner talked to her was at a Director’s Guild event, where she couldn’t see him during their reunion, since she was losing her eyesight due to diabetes. The last years of her life, Reiner recalls, were sad, but he also reminiscences about happy early years, when he cast Moore in ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show.’ When searching for an actress, he was given the guideline, “You’ll know when you find it.” When Reiner saw Mary, he knew he had found “it.”

Going back to his book, Reiner reads King a review jokingly attributed to Mark Twain. He talks about being a fan of Twain and his love for Twain’s novels. King asks how Reiner feels about the shift from print to phones, and how he uses modern technology. Reiner wishes his inventor dad were alive to see the progress. Every day, Reiner writes an anti-Trump tweet, in hopes of helping impeach Trump. Though, Reiner admits, “he’s impeaching himself.” He tells King about tweeting a video where people go about their business under the Trump presidency, but scream all the time. Reiner believes Trump is the worst president ever, and laments Trump’s efforts to pull the Affordable Care Act and lower taxes.

From politics, King shifts the conversation to Reiner’s personal life and kids. Reiner adores his three adult children, who give him great joy. He recalls conversing with his son, director Rob Reiner, about films, and realizing that Rob directed favorites like ‘When Harry Met Sally.’