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Dave Rubin, Lalo Dagach, and Gad Saad on Debating The Regressive Left

More from Ora: Dave Rubin, Lalo Dagach, and Gad Saad on Debating The Regressive Left

Authoritarians Want to Rip Us Apart

The Rubin ReportMar 02 '16

"The power of ideas is universal. When we discuss free speech, free thought and free expression it is vital that we mean it equally for everyone, not just in an identity politics based pecking order." Stay tuned for clips from Dave's interview with Inna Shevchenko coming today, tomorrow 3/3, the full interview airing Friday 3/4 at 12pm EST.

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TRANSCRIPT FROM THIS 'DIRECT MESSAGE' WITH DAVE RUBIN:

Published on Ora TV on March 2, 2016:

One of my favorite aspects of The Rubin Report is the feedback we're getting from viewers from literally all over the world. Just last week, I had viewers from countries like Egypt, Denmark, Mexico, Spain and Australia reach out to me, just to name a few. I'm truly humbled so many of you take the time to share your feelings with me, and, although I don't have time to respond to everyone, I do try to read all the messages your sending.To me, the most amazing part of this is that the conversations we're having on this show are transcending race, religion, sexuality and nationality. The fight for free speech, the importance of not giving into the authoritarians and the awakening against the regressives are all ideas that bring us together. The power of ideas is universal. When we discuss free speech, free thought and free expression it is vital that we mean it equally for everyone, not just in an identity politics based pecking order.

This device (hold up iphone) we all have in our pocket is bringing us closer together in ways that were literally unimaginable only a generation ago. Right this very second, one of you is watching this Direct Message while on the subway in New York City, one of you is listening to the podcast while at the gym in London, and one of you is streaming this while on your couch in Moscow. Not only are you all tuning in on a variety of platforms, but you're furthering the discussion of these ideas on Facebook and Twitter, or just by talking with your friends and family. That expansion of our conversations makes me want to do better work even if talking about difficult topics comes at both a personal and professional cost.

As the world has gotten smaller, it has never been more important to hear voices that challenge our thinking and give unique perspective based on their personal story.My guest this week is Inna Shevchenko. Inna is the leader of the women's movement 'Femen International,' a columnist for the International Business Times and a free speech activist. She was born in Ukraine the same year that the USSR fell, has been kidnapped by the Belarus KGB and in 2013 was granted political asylum in France. She has lived a truly controversial life and paid the price for being outspoken more than once.This is not someone who only talks about the news, this is someone who lives it. There are many issues I want to discuss with Inna, from women's rights and free speech, to Islamism and political correctness, but I also want to talk about life in France right now. Has it changed since the Paris terror attacks? What's the political climate? Has the regressive mentality steeped into the mainstream thus weakening free speech and helping the authoritarians? The only way we can find answers to questions like this is to be connected with people who aren't afraid to share their views.

You know, there'sa catch 22 to our connectivity -- as it brings us closer and transcends cultures and borders, it can also make everyone else's problems seem like our own. On one hand, we can see how others live and have empathy for our fellow man. On the other hand, sometimes it's hard to gauge how much something happening across the globe should affect us in our day to day lives. I try to do this show each week in the spirit of finding balance between those two concepts, and I hope Inna will provide perspective on some of the big questions I've mentioned here. The more we focus on our common humanity, the less chance we'll be able to be ripped apart.

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